PANERAI RADIOMIR PAM00685 & PAM00687

With Nobel Prize-winner Marie Curie’s discovery of the material radium in 1898 came a widespread fascination with the stuff. At this point, its deadly properties weren’t known let alone understood, and by the 1920s several companies—Panerai included—had developed commercial uses for the substance. This wasn’t limited to watches: the ‘health’—in inverted commas—benefits of Radium resulted in a radium-lined water container called the ‘Revigator’, which claimed to cure arthritis amongst other things; radium-based foodstuffs like bread and chocolate; and a radium-laced toothpaste given the seal of approval by a Doctor Alfred Curie—no relation to Marie Curie whatsoever. Clinics and spas were dedicated to the supposedly curative properties of radium. The trademark radium glow was even used in cosmetics and children’s toys.Image result for PANERAI RADIOMIR PAM00685 & PAM00687

In 1936, dive gauge manufacturer Officine Panerai and watchmaker Rolex joined forces to build a watch at the request of the Italian Royal Navy. Intended for use during covert, night-time dives, Panerai’s expertise gave what was essentially a complete watch from Rolex that extra level of functionality: a glowing dial. With numerals that shone clear and legible at a consistent and unfaltering rate, the PaneraiRadiomir was unstoppable. There was just one tiny problem with it, however—that glowing dial was deadly.Now, radium itself doesn’t glow, but its radiation can excite the electrons in a phosphorescent material like zinc sulphide, which then emits energy as light. This was the basis of Panerai’s glowing Radiomir paint, which it patented in 1916. Note the Italian for ‘patented’, Brevettato, as seen on this Radiomir 685 1938 re-edition. Across the Atlantic in America, meanwhile, and a slew of radium-based paint brands were springing up. Radium was the most expensive material by weight in the world at the time, and the demand was huge. Factories employed thousands of ladies to apply this glowing paint to many different products, including watch dials. When the girls left the factories at night, they themselves glowed. At the time, it was considered a perk.

Breitling’s full potential

“Breitling watch”的图片搜索结果

Breitling operates two manufacturing facilities, in Grenchen and La Chaux-de-Fonds and is famed for its pilot watches.CVC will acquire an 80 per cent stake in the watchmaker with owner Theodore Schneider “re-investing” and retaining 20 per cent of the company which began in 1884.

Schneider is quoted in European media at the weekend saying, “I am convinced CVC is the right partner to elevate Breitling to the next level. CVC’s expertise, track-record and international network will help unlock Breitling’s full potential.”

Other reports suggest China is seen as a market of great potential to the brand, one whose mostly larger-sized watches have not been a natural choice there to this point. Breitling reported sales of some $US420 million last year, but has been rumoured to be up for sale for some time. It is one of the few brands not belonging to the four luxury conglomerates: Richemont, the Swatch Group, LVMH and to a lesser extent Kering. Swiss watch exports rose for the first time in March, ending their longest slump on record.

That said shipments to Hong Kong rallied 18 per cent for the month while China rallied 38 per cent, the biggest advance in two years and the sixth consecutive monthly gain there, while exports to the US rose 16 per cent.

And Australia? Up 21.1 per cent this March compared with March 2016. In total Swiss watch exports – viewed as a yardstick for demand – grew 7.5 per cent to 1.6 billion Swiss francs for the month, still well shy of the 2 billion-odd figure of a few years back.

REVIEW: PANERAI RADIOMIR PAM00685 & PAM00687

“Panerai watch”的图片搜索结果

With Nobel Prize-winner Marie Curie’s discovery of the material radium in 1898 came a widespread fascination with the stuff. At this point, its deadly properties weren’t known let alone understood, and by the 1920s several companies—Panerai included—had developed commercial uses for the substance. This wasn’t limited to watches: the ‘health’—in inverted commas—benefits of Radium resulted in a radium-lined water container called the ‘Revigator’, which claimed to cure arthritis amongst other things; radium-based foodstuffs like bread and chocolate; and a radium-laced toothpaste given the seal of approval by a Doctor Alfred Curie—no relation to Marie Curie whatsoever. Clinics and spas were dedicated to the supposedly curative properties of radium. The trademark radium glow was even used in cosmetics and children’s toys.Image result for PANERAI RADIOMIR PAM00685 & PAM00687

In 1936, dive gauge manufacturer Officine  and watchmaker Rolex joined forces to build a watch at the request of the Italian Royal Navy. Intended for use during covert, night-time dives, Panerai’s expertise gave what was essentially a complete watch from Rolex that extra level of functionality: a glowing dial. With numerals that shone clear and legible at a consistent and unfaltering rate, the Panerai Radiomir was unstoppable. There was just one tiny problem with it, however—that glowing dial was deadly.Now, radium itself doesn’t glow, but its radiation can excite the electrons in a phosphorescent material like zinc sulphide, which then emits energy as light. This was the basis of Panerai’s glowing Radiomir paint, which it patented in 1916. Note the Italian for ‘patented’, Brevettato, as seen on this Radiomir 685 1938 re-edition. Across the Atlantic in America, meanwhile, and a slew of radium-based paint brands were springing up. Radium was the most expensive material by weight in the world at the time, and the demand was huge. Factories employed thousands of ladies to apply this glowing paint to many different products, including watch dials. When the girls left the factories at night, they themselves glowed. At the time, it was considered a perk.